Category Archives: Fashion

Runway 2018: Diverge

A Path to Inclusive Fashion

It is understood that in the world of fashion there tends to be a standard whose existence is not a true reflection of all types of bodies and people. This standard earns a living of off excluding and making others who don’t quite ‘fit the bill’ feel like they are lesser and not important. Most have gotten used to not being represented and just accept it as a norm or accepted the inevitable struggle of not finding clothes that are actually made for all types of people. This lack of representation causes society to adopt this sort of implicit bias when it comes to what is normal fashion and San Francisco State’s very own Apparel Design and Merchandising department is breaking that barrier with full force.

Continue reading Runway 2018: Diverge

How To: 6 Styled Looks Any Gender Can Pull Off

Growing up my mother believed that pink dresses were going to be a staple in my baby wardrobe. Boy, was she wrong. As the years went by I came in contact with this thing called “comfort”, which then became what was going to define my style. I hated dresses, heels, or anything that society threw at me to try and define my gender.

I do identify myself as female, but my that doesn’t mean my closet has to have a gender. Feminine attire mixed with stud-like apparel makes up my closet. To make this simple, I see clothes as materials that I drape on myself that make me who I am.

Most of my shopping is done at thrift stores, if not that, you’ll find me searching through the endless online sale sections. When I look for clothes, whether it’d be male or female, I pick what I think will pair right with something else. Whenever I’m in the men’s section, I usually get asked if I’m shopping for my boyfriend and I respond with, “No I’m shopping for myself.” They usually say things along the lines of “That’s cool!” or “You have great taste in fashion.”

What would it be like if things were switched? What if I was a male and found myself in the women’s section? What kind of responses would I get? I’m more than positive that most people wouldn’t respond to me with the same kindness. So why does gender have to play such a big role in clothes? Yes, we wear it, but does it have to define us?

I took it upon myself to search through the piles of clothes that I own and decided to style two volunteers that let me do so. My point here is to show you that any gender is capable of wearing whatever they want. Someone who identifies as a man can wear a complete female inspired outfit, and vice versa, as I have done so with these looks. My male model is wearing only female clothing and my female model is wearing male inspired clothes.

Although stores are lacking a great diversity, from what I’ve seen, I want to ensure you that it is possible to create such looks. Through the looks that you’re about to see, the models are wearing clothes that belong and have been styled completely by me.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

 

In the first look, 22-year-old Aliguas Paningbatan is wearing an oversized jersey from Urban Outfitters. It’s paired with an oversized male inspired denim jacket from Forever 21. Accessories include a pair of black Yeezy sneakers from Adidas and a mustard yellow beanie from Forever 21. Wearing oversized shirts as dresses is a key to expanding your wardrobe.

The second look dives into a fall look with warm tone colors, such as green and brown. She’s wearing a patterned, forest-green top from Urban Outfitters. The camo-green army jacket was thrifted, and so are the jeans that I cut up myself. A nice pair of comfy black-and-white vans with a forest-green beanie from Forever 21 ties the outfit together. A tip I like to give when wearing men’s button-ups is buttoning them down halfway and then tying the other half into a knot to create a cute crop top.

My last look is serving west coast vibes to the max. She is wearing a pair of black sweatpants from ASOS, matched with a white cropped top that shows just the right amount of skin. Paired again with a black-and-white pair of vans, long white socks, and green beanie to finish the look. I love creating a laid-back look that you can also wear if leaving the house.

When 24-year-old Jonathan Marquez volunteered to let me dress him, I couldn’t have had been more excited. I had to find outfits in my closet that would tailor his body, and at the same time, make him look damn good.

In the first outfit, I styled him in a black velvet button-up that my mother passed down to me, paired with a multi-colored bomber jacket from H&M. A sleek pair of ripped black jeans, and a pair of combat boots from Charlotte Russe bring the outfit together. For accessories, I had him throw on a black boater hat from H&M and a copper-coined necklace to add a bit of flavor in the mix. All-black outfits are my favorite and they make it easy to bring to life with either bright jacket or vintage jewelry.

In his second look, I put together a pair of thrifted black chino shorts with a floral peplum collared shirt from Forever 21. A thrifted leather jacket and a black beret with tall green socks make the look edgy and inviting. A pair of high-waist shorts are my go to especially when pairing them with a bold shirt.

In his final look, I went with sizzling colors that made the look rich and perfect for the fall. A burnt orange off-the-shoulder shirt from Urban Outfitters layered with a paisley patterned jacket from Topman go hand-in-hand. Coral skinny jeans, tan slip on booties, and vintage sunglasses from Amazon make this a head-turning look that screams comfort. When choosing a color for an outfit, it’s best to start with a colored shirt and add on clothes that fall along the lines of that pigment. If you want to wear one color all over your outfit without drowning in it, it’s best to have a solid item to begin with and then add prints on top.

In Their Shoes: Challenging Gender Norms Through Androgynous Apparel

Once upon a time there was a world where any gender could walk into a clothing store and not have to worry what sex they were shopping for. As amazing as that may sound, for now it can only remain a dream that can one day hopefully become a reality. Don’t give up yet, there are still options!

When it comes to apparel now-a-days, I can say that I’ve seen it all. Women dressed in tailored suits, men in chiffon skirts, and kids in non-gender clothing. I grew up as a tomboy, so wearing my brothers big shirts and oversized pants were easy to obtain. This memory led me to question what it would’ve been like for me as a young boy trying to fit into my sisters clothes. The truth is, I probably wouldn’t of been able to fit any of it due to the way my body was built. Is this what goes through the minds of men who prefer to wear women’s clothes?

After interviewing some students from San Francisco State University, along with faculty and people from the San Francisco community, they said yes. The three main issues that were brought up the most when asked were the main audience being focused on women and femininity, the lack of sizes, and clothing stores sticking to the regular boy/girl sections.

 

Monét Panza, 19, Poses in Vans and
baggy windbreakers. (Left and Right)
Photos: Jazmine Sanchez

What really defines androgynous apparel?

For people like Aaron Steinfeld, 25-year-old graduate student at Sf State, and LGBTQ youth advocate at the Family Violence Law Center, androgyny means an ambiguous gender identity or gender representation, which can deal with either someone’s internal sense of how they think of themselves and or how they present that to the world.

“There definitely seems to be more gender/queer presentation in fashion, but I think that there’s a difference between gender identity and gender presentation, and someone who might have an ambiguous or androgynous gender presentation, and might as a cisgender person,” Steinfeld says.

“I’m trans and I like presenting feminine in society to lure the rest of the world, and how putting on clothes everyday feels very important to me to display an accurate representation of myself to the world.”

In fashion, androgyny has been seen more and more on the catwalk by designers like Gucci, Kanye West (and many more), and most recently at New York Fashion Week, Maison the Faux. So it’s no surprise that non-gender clothing has been making itself a big debut. According to 44-year-old Health Education Professor at SF State, Ivy Chen, a lot has been driven by the acceptance of it through Millennials and the new Generation Z.

“Millennials and Generation Z are much more open and accepting of all different kinds of identities, and therefore those types of attitudes about discriminating and feeling like you only can be this and that, those attitudes will die out,” she says.

Students like 18-year-old Broadcast and Electronic Communication Arts major, Karla Orozco, feels that androgynous apparel is in fact favoring the female sex – that it is easier for women to find male clothing than for men to find female clothing.

“If it’s going to be something that’s for everyone then it should be for everyone you know? I think that’s definitely something that has to change in the industry,” Orozco says.  Another student like Rosa Gutierrez, 20-year-old Biology Major also agrees. “I do agree that it’s harder for men to find clothes which usually leaves them without a section to look into,” Gutierrez says.

Aaron Steinfeld, 25, in pink velvet mini-dress.

The facts are that the “rules to fashion” have continued to change throughout the years and we’ve seen this through many advertisements, and also, on the fashion runway. But the real question here is has the industry limited itself to a certain audience?

“Millennials and Generation Z are much more open and accepting of all different kinds of identities, and therefore those types of attitudes about discriminating and feeling like you only can be this and that, those attitudes will die out.”

Of the bigger community, when seeing sizes range from only small to large, it shows that these clothing companies are limiting themselves and not serving the whole audience.

28-year-old graphic design professor at California College of the Arts, Juan Carlos, feels that fashion has always been portrayed for the skinny community.

Juan Carlos, 28, Graphic Design Professor at California College of the Arts

“A lot of the clothes that androgynous apparel companies make, and I’m happy it’s being made, fits mostly models that are super skinny, and when you’re bigger you have more restriction on what to wear, and it’s a lot harder to find clothes that fit,” Carlos says.

When shopping in the women’s section he is usually a size 10 or 12, and because of his size, he feels that thrift shopping offers a wider variety of things for everyone.

I find myself doing the same thing. As a hip-hop dancer, I’ve always enjoyed wearing slouchy clothes because of its comfort. I hate wearing tight clothes that don’t let me breathe, and because of my figure, I find myself making my own clothes. The same thing goes for Juan Carlos and many others.

Drag queen Jordan Isaac, also known as “Kiki Krazier,” finds himself making his own women-inspired clothes for his performances due to the lack of sizes being offered to him.  

“Most of my clothes are made, but if I do have to buy something, it is a bit unflattering on me,” he explains.

“For example, I have to make a dress out of an oversized shirt because I can’t fit a store bought dress. They don’t have that for men, they do not sell dresses for men. Most companies who say they want to offer androgynous clothing mostly focus on women. The truth is, if you want something that is tailored to your body, you either make it yourself or get it made for you.”

Companies like Target have already jumped on the no-gender apparel bandwagon by switching up their Boy and Girl sections to just Kids. Is this what is going to pave the way for families to open up their mind on allowing their children to wear whatever clothes they feel comfortable with?

Chen explains that companies like Target are being very inclusive.

“For example, in the past you had a kid who would identify as a girl and you would only stay in this one section, and you’ve never even seen the boys section, that’s a whole half that you actually don’t browse and don’t have the opportunity to buy from.”

As a company, Chen feels that it is a smart financial move that will allow customers to see everything the company has to offer rather than just a single section.

Clothing companies like Kipper Clothiers in San Francisco have made a statement by offering women tailored suits to those who want it. Other companies like Sixty-Nine, based in Los Angeles, offer clothing that doesn’t fall under labels, simply clothes for anyone to wear. And there are many more following suit – the only thing is that although it is such a great movement, there are people that feel companies are still lacking on the aspects of gender, sizes, and clothing stores conforming to boy/girl sections.

The more we open up, have more visibility, and mainstream non-gender clothing, could possibly change what these companies are lacking to serve all sexes. An array of clothing items being displayed, ranging from multiple colors and sizes that anyone can pick up and take home, is a dream, for some, waiting to be seen in retail stores. The fashion industry has a lot to offer, and hopefully through time, it will be capable to offer this as well.

 

Featured Photo: Aaron Steinfeld, 25, dons eye-catching lipstick and
eyeshadow. Aaron is a LGBTQ youth advocate at Family Violence Law Center 

All photography by Jazmine Sanchez

Resort Fashion 2016: Is it Innovation? Or just location?

From the shores of Seoul, to the backyard of the late Bob Hope’s Palm Springs home, designers are sure trying to garner attention for their Resort 2016 looks based on the place that they are presented. I guess it is how it sounds, though, because when deciding on where to vacation, its all about location, location, location.

These Resort 2016 collections seem to have been the jack of all trades, and the trades being inspirations for future fashion weeks to come. It’s my belief that the creative directors from Dior, Louis Vuitton, and Chanel weren’t dreaming of the beach and warm weather when designing these looks, rather, they were dreaming of innovation.

Christain Dior Resort 2016. Photo by Gianni Pucci.

Raf Simons, when choosing the location for the show, chose Le Palais Bulles, located in the south of France on the cliffs between Monaco and Cannes. Simons said to Style.com that the location, from his eyes, was, “playful, sweet and childish almost.”

You can see the location inspiration translating into the collection. With a series of thinly striped plaids, circle and a-line skirts lined with fishnets, subtle knit accents (a hint maybe?), as well as glimmering sequined rompers, the collection did, sort of, exude childishness. Although, the Dior sophistication shined through when Simons presented silk, sleeveless dresses, (to my surprise) black structured pant suits, and their signature low-height heels. No surprise there.

Christian Dior Resort 2016. Photo by Gianni Pucci.

The combination of youthfulness and dignity sure made this resort collection ingenious in more ways than one. Just like the desert sun, this collection surely radiated confidence, yet, I could not personally see one wearing these pieces at say, Coachella, or BottleRock. But fashionistas, will, and have, dared to cross the line, and why not cross it with Dior fishnets and shimmery sequins?

Louis Vuitton Resort 2016. Photo by Alessandro Garofalo.

Nicolas Ghesquiere’s was handed the reigns of Louis Vuitton not even a year ago, and he is already doing some serious brand development with the latest collection. Let me explain. From the start of this Resort 2016 show, Ghesquiere’s already had a vision. That vision being Bob Hope and his $25 million Palm Springs home, the backdrop for the runway show.

“I love the idea of being sweet and hard at the same time,” Ghesquiere’s commented to Style.com, referring to the estate, which is currently for sale for the aforementioned amount.

What a way to sum up LV into such a little amount of words. Let’s take in for consideration the signature stiletto, fun and friendly on top, red and devious on the bottom. Ghesquiere’s sure has a hold on the mission of the brand, I will give him that. However, the collection, innovative for sure, shared similar creative styles as other top tier designers, such as Alexander Wang.

Louis Vuitton Resort 2016. Photo by Alessandro Garofalo.

The collection was filled with prints, stripes, combinations of exquisite fabrics, contrasts of colors and styles, alongside a lot of layering. For example, pleather shorts paired with an equally pleather top, long, flowing skirts and pants with crop tops, off-the-shoulder cutouts, boxy suede jackets and silk blouses. Sound familiar? Unless black, boxy and flowy is totally in, and I’m just missing the cue, there may have been some creative overlap on the playing field.

All criticisms aside, the individual pieces truly did tell a story. That story being, Ghesquiere’s knows how to reel in a crowd and hold their attention.

Chanel Resort 2016. Photo by Yannis Vlamos.

I had a dream the other night where I thought, well believed, that I met Karl Lagerfeld, Chanel’s creative director. In this dream I was finally able to see him without his, almost permanent, sunglasses on. I was so ecstatic, I was going to tell everyone, then I woke up.

I’m thinking that this was a sign, a sign eluding me to Chanel’s Resort 2016 collection, which was shown off the coast of Seoul. I’m still figuring out the meaning behind the dream, but I know that this collection, is one for the books.

Lagerfeld continually puts out excellent products in the form of fashion, and of course, this particular collection was a great example. Themes from Paris Fashion Week can be seen here, but what’s not to love. The Korean inspiration for this collection offered Lagerfeld with a wider range of creative perspective, not needed, but sought after.

Chanel attracts celebrity attention as Korean culture attracts worldwide trends, so truly, the two go hand in hand. The pieces in this particular collection were extremely engaging. The colors were bubbly, the prints were pastel, the patent was well-placed, and the jumpers and drop-waisted skirts were a great addition to the already present trend.

Chanel Resort 2016. Photo by Yannis Vlamos via Style.com.

The collection made me feel as if I was almost traveling through time, yet still remaining modern. I could see Peggy Olson, from AMC’s Mad Men, wearing the pastel purple signature Chanel coat with the patch-worked pencil skirt, well, only if she was willing, and able (to pay for it). I’m sure Jackie Kennedy, and Audrey Hepburn, would be in love with the drop-waisted collared and pleated dress, if it came with a Chanel bag, of course. Finally, I could see contemporary artist FKA Twigs in the high waisted cut-out black and white skirt, as well as the oxford-styled white layered blouse.

Lagerfeld truly knows how to woo an audience, but I guess there’s perks when Anna Wintour is on your speed dial.

 

Resort 2016 sure feels like a teaser for the September fashion weeks, but let’s take one from the books, take a chill pill (accompanied with a mimosa) and enjoy the fashion-frenzy free-time we have until then.

It’s All About Bridal Fashion Week- For Now.

Photo courtesy of Carolina Herrera. 

If you are affluent in fashion, you know very well of Paris, New York, Milan and London Fashion Weeks, whether it be spring or fall; but are you well-versed with Bridal Week?

This writer, was not. I always knew that some designers, like, obviously, Vera Wang and Oscar de la Renta, were known for their bridal gowns, but I never knew that there was a dedicated week for showing them off, like there is for the above mentioned fashion weeks. I guess when you are not a soon-to-be bride you are not too concerned with designer bridal gowns. However, after one look, I was hooked.

Bridal Fashion Week is much more than just bridal gowns, it’s a chance for designers to entirely change the scope of what traditional wedding gowns are “supposed” to look like, in each of their own particular ways.

Photo courtesy of Vera Wang.

Vera Wang, who has dressed Heidi Klum and Chelsea Clinton for their weddings, displayed quite an existential modern day collection. The line screamed for millennial attention, while simultaneously exuding millennial characteristics: dignified, yet daring.

Classic silhouettes, structured, and trimmed with lace, but sheer, with black accents; generally a big no-no for the big day, Wang decided to run with it, creating a new scope for the new modern bride, while still staying true to her previous bridal lines.

Photo courtesy of Oscar de la Renta.

Oscar de la Renta himself still can be seen in this season’s Bridal Spring 2016 line, even with his passing last October. Peter Copping, the new creative director for the brand, told Vogue that he wanted this line to be entirely focused on the bride… Ahem… who else?

“You have to remember: Most of these dresses are seen from behind,” Copping told Vogue. “That was something I really wanted to consider: to think how it would look when the bride is in front of everyone, and to make it as gorgeous as the front.”

Now that’s all sorted out, we can focus on the collection. Copping was able to retain the regal elegance that de la Renta set forward when he began his fashion house in 1965, that being, simple and elegant, while giving off the essence of individuality and exclusivity. For example, a cocktail gown, white, with lace trim and a high neckline, right after a feathered corset ballgown, this collection was an example of the smooth transition from de la Renta’s hands to Copping’s.

Photo courtesy of Marchesa.

Marchesa, who dressed fashionista Blake Lively for her wedding to Ryan Reynolds, is relatively new to the bridal world, only beginning in 2004. Known for their delicately embellished and sophisticated gowns, it is my belief that color was on the mind of Keren Craig and Georgina Chapman, the founders and creative directors for the brand.

It seems that an eggshell-ish creme color decorated their Bridal Spring 2016 collection, with no white in sight. The hue of the gowns did not misguide their tone, however. Marchesa kept with their mission: designing one-of-a-kind detail-oriented gowns to the brides who crave worldly couture, but this time, with a loss of white.

Bridal Week may be that second-leg layover from the spring fashion weeks, but it is just as worthy, if you give it a shot.

See more trends from Bridal Week Spring 2016 here.

 

University Design:School Pride and Fashion Collide

  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

Written by Melissa Landeros
Photos by Tony Santos

Thick, coarse, dirty, unbearable to get around—SF State design students could not help but complain about having to work with such a difficult material for clothing. The royal purple and gold SF State banners that span all around campus were taken down from their poles and placed in the hands of the design students from the Apparel Design and Merchandising department (ADM). The students were given a task that would challenge their design skills. They were to create garments for Runway 2014: Provoke, an annual fashion show that the Fashion Network Association, a student-run organization, helps produce.

“We saw the material and were like what are we going to do with this,” says Soraya Davallou a design student. Aside from the material being an unknown fiber there were restrictions that accompanied the design process. The concept of “Universal Design” was set in place, meaning the construction of the garments needed to be unisex, and wearable for any shape or size.

The students’ work-space was comprised of long tables, sewing machines, and dress forms. The student designers scrambled to pin, sew, steam, and put together their purple and gold garments.

Nevertheless, the ADM students sought out this challenge in full force. Some manipulated the banners into becoming a softer material to work with by ironing it. Others dealt with broken sewing machine needles as well as edges that were rough and left unfinished.

“I really wanted the SF State logo to stand out in order to show school pride,” says Helen Nguyen. The designer and her partner did not like the restrictions of the designs but overcame them by adding adjustable straps to the garment in order to fit it in the one-size-fits-all spectrum.

While some students honed in on school pride, others focused on creating garments that would be considered unisex. Panphila Tan and her partner did just that by constructing a vest and a quilt that was adjustable with Velcro.

After struggling with such difficult material the design students executed seven garments that range from a modern kimono, a zoot suit and, a motorcycle inspired jacket and pant. From the workroom to the runway, the looks will be showcased at the San Francisco Design Center May 1st.

Design and Refine

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Written Melissa Landeros
Photos by John Ornelas

Bright lighting. Hues of earth tones. Pops of color. A mix of sleek jackets, tailored dresses, intricate outerwear, and fine accessories.  At five thousand square feet, the 440 Brannan studio and showroom is a combined workspace and shopping oasis comprising the ultimate wardrobe selection for all city slickers.

This thriving showroom, equipped with sewing machines, worktables, and a trendy atmosphere, lives up to their slogan of “wear something rare,” because that is exactly what it offers.

Garments are made directly in the showroom and once completed are put out on the floor for purchase. Clients can even stop in and see their

One of the designers working on her garment at the co-op, 440 Brannan Studio. Photo by John Ornelas / Xpress
One of the designers working on her garment at the co-op, 440 Brannan Studio. Photo by John Ornelas / Xpress

garment-to-be right on the cutting table during the creating process.  The showroom sets the stage for up-and-coming Bay Area designers to really show their gusto for fashion design.

Since 1996 owner Rodger Alan has kept 440 Brannan up and running.  His studio was not always a place where designers could produce their garments, but Alan says he “decided to share.”  He brought about the idea of allowing people to rent space and produce what they wanted.

Aside from Alan opening up his space to designers he also has opened it up to students. “You don’t just sweep up the floor when you work here, I actually teach you, and you learn shit,” Alan says. Many of the students working at the studio get hands on experience, and can create their own pieces as well.

Megan Jee, an SF State merchandising student, manages the studio and interns. She oversees the selection process of prospective designers and helps host the studios weekly fashion happy hour on Fridays from four forty to eight o’clock. Since not everyone is a designer and has the opportunity to create something, customers can go into the studio and browse the unique collections while sipping on free wine or beer. “What I really like about this studio is that you are free to create whatever you want,” Jee says.

Former SF State student Marco Ruiz is a current designer and says he really enjoys working at the studio, and appreciates the equipment Allan makes available. Ruiz also says that working at 440 Brannan has provided him with more experience and the opportunity to expand his brand in the future.

Alan says this is a place where, “you make things to sell.” His studio usually incorporates five to eight designers. However, there is a process individuals need to go through before they can rent a space.

One thing that Alan focuses on is whether or not prospective designers produce garments that will portray a similar street style that his studio embodies. The clean-cut urbanite that could take their looks from evening to night is the perfect candidate.  “Someone who makes wedding dresses would not work well in the studio,” Alan says.

Consistently featured menswear designers include Alan’s line Hieros, which is made of limited edition pieces and streetwise menswear. Alan’s esthetic is simple, he says, “If I want to make a cropped jacket, I make it.” Alan designs whatever he feels like creating, and he makes it in his size first. If one of his designs is in high demand he’ll make more.  If not, Alan keeps it for himself.

Women’s wear is also featured alongside the menswear designs.  Gordano is a modern unique clothing line created by Jill Giordano and Brian Scheyer that is inspired by architecture. Their designs include tops, dresses, and bottoms that can easily be converted from day to night.

Quality is important to Alan.  Thats what 440 Brannan is all about, a quality garment, made by quality designers in a space where maximum creativity is encouraged.

Halloween Costumes For a Broke College Student

Written by Macy Williams & Sarah Todd
Photos by John Ornelas

Had midterms last week? If so, we know for a fact that you haven’t even thought about a Halloween costume. The festivities are just a few days away, so we put together five budget-friendly costumes for fellow gators with a small amount of time and an even smaller amount of money.

  • Model: Celeste Feeling clever? Psychology majors will appreciate this costume. Throw on a silky slip and attach Freudian phrases to it. Look at you, getting all sassy and smart.
    Feeling clever? Psychology majors will appreciate this costume. Throw on a silky slip and attach Freudian phrases to it. Look at you, getting all sassy and smart.
  • Freudian Slip
    Model: Celeste
  • Everyone has an umbrella shoved in the back of their closet--it’s San Francisco, after all. Transform your old bumbershoot into everyone’s favorite sea creature with a little ribbon and a hot glue gun. Your friends will have no trouble finding you at the bar with this costume.
    Everyone has an umbrella shoved in the back of their closet--it’s San Francisco, after all. Transform your old bumbershoot into everyone’s favorite sea creature with a little ribbon and a hot glue gun. Your friends will have no trouble finding you at the bar with this costume.
  • jellyfish
    Model: Mike Hendrickson
  • Model: Sarah Got a sheet? Perfect, the classic sheet ghost costume is complete. But if you want to really turn heads this year, throw a bra on over that sheet and transform into a sexy sheet ghost. Laughs are guaranteed.
    Got a sheet? Perfect, the classic sheet ghost costume is complete. But if you want to really turn heads this year, throw a bra on over that sheet and transform into a sexy sheet ghost. Laughs are guaranteed.
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    Model: Sarah
  • Model: Sarah Todd The government shutdown has come and gone, but everyone is still talking about it. There’s nothing better than making fun of politics, so throw on some old pajama bottoms with a suit and tie and bam, you are a government official on holiday.
    The government shutdown has come and gone, but everyone is still talking about it. There’s nothing better than making fun of politics, so throw on some old pajama bottoms with a suit and tie and bam, you are a government official on holiday.
  • The Government Shutdown
    Model: Sarah Todd
  • Model: Virginia Tieman Remember those naked little troll dolls that sat and stared at you with beady little eyes? Let’s bring them to life! Use a nude colored tank top and glue a gem-like piece of paper to the  bellybutton area. Grab some spray hair dye and pull your hair into a point. Ladies will look adorable and guys will be downright creepy. It’s a win-win situation.
    Remember those naked little troll dolls that sat and stared at you with beady little eyes? Let’s bring them to life! Use a nude colored tank top and glue a gem-like piece of paper to the bellybutton area. Grab some spray hair dye and pull your hair into a point. Ladies will look adorable and guys will be downright creepy. It’s a win-win situation.
  • Troll Doll
    Model: Virginia Tieman

Embracing All Sizes

 

When someone hears the word “model” most people picture this 6 foot tall ,a size two women with lots of confidence and a sense of power to take command on a fashion runway. However, Morgan Weinert sees the word “model” in a different light.

SF State held its annual Body Positive Week and first ever “All-Bodies Fashion Show,” where it supports both the love for fashion and the different shapes and sizes people may have. For one whole week, students participated in different activities and workshops to help them love the most important person in their lives, themselves.

To kick off Body Positive Week, Weinert created an activity involving a chalk outline of ones body. Students were asked to point out one part of their body that they liked and say why. They also had to pick one part of their body that they did not like and turn it into a positive.

Weinert produced the fashion show because, “fashion is a great way for people to reclaim their body.” While it was San Francisco Fashion Week, it was also Body Positive Week in the Residential Life community.

Weinert believed that by having a fashion show open to all sizes in which students could model their own wardrobe it would lessen students negativity about their weight. During Body Positive Week one of Weinert’s goals was for students to understand that being healthy goes beyond nutrition and exercise. She, in addition, believes one’s sexuality, emotionally being, and stress levels are also things to take into consideration with one‘s wellbeing.

Weinert has been the Health and Wellness Coordinator for Residential Life for about 6 months now. Weinert is responsible for developing and implementing workshops, presentations, and activities that help reduce harm to oneself. Such activities include sexual wellness, sexual assault, exercise, and nutrition.

The following day students listened to Virgie Tovar, an activist and lecturer on fat discrimination and body image. Tovar’s lecture revolved around having better sex through body love. The third day marked National Women’s Health and Fitness Day, held at Malcolm X Plaza. Students were able to get information regarding sexual health, nutrition through games and brochures. The event also revolved around raising awareness about violence against women in order to prevent it.

The fashion show was the grand finale of Body Positive Week. Having declared the show open to all shapes and sizes it “gave people the opportunity to be fashionable in their own body,” Weinert says. SF State student Rajit Sandhu who modeled in the show says, “I was nervous to go out on the runway but I was still confidant and owned my body.”

The fashion show was said to feature San Francisco stylist Zuriel Bautista, who is inspired by the diversity of modern popular culture, but due to an unfortunate car accident he was not able to attend. Bautista’s aesthetic is influenced most by his grandfather’s wardrobe from the 1970’s and his utility workwear. This altered the timeliness of the fashion show and how many looks went down the runway. Nevertheless, the show went on, and hopefully the show will continue to be says Weinert.

At the same time, the show featured a handful of student fashionistas, it also featured lines from 31 Rax and Nooworks. 31 Rax is thrift store that offers hand-picked, vintage clothing for men and women. Owner Stephanie Madrinan who was present at the All Bodies Fashion Shows says, “the clothing found at 31 Rax is out of my own closet.” The models strutted down the runway in dresses, tribal print pieces, and all paired with unique jewelry. This vintage thrift store will soon be featured solely online and will also feature extended sizes.

Nooworks features numerous artists who create prints, which are then turned into garments such as dresses, shirts, and or leggings. Nooworks is also a participating store that currently carries plus sizes up to 18, but they plan on expanding their sizes to 4x. The clothing featured at the show was showcased by SF State students as well by Morgan Weinert who wore colorful, bold printed leggings.

While the fashion show was the grand final Weinert also encouraged students to attend the Folsom Street Fair that Sunday. Weinert says, “Folsom is a great way for those you are recently on their own to explore.” College is a great time to create who you want to be and everyone should take advantage of that says Weinert.

If there was only one important thing that Weinert wanted students to take away from all of Body Positive Week was that everyone should be excited to reclaim their body and that we are only given one body so appreciate it.

The SF State community took a stand in representing all types of individuals through the fashion show, opening the door for other student fashionistas thanks to Weinert. If that was not enough of a milestone for fashion, one may want to know that this year there was the first ever plus-sized line featured in New York Fashion Week by designer Eden Miller. Fashion is for everyone no matter what size you are.

Trending: SFSU Students Play with Pattern

By Macy Williams and Melissa Landeros
Photos by Mike Hendrickson

Print is never easy to pull off, but with a little swagger these students mix it up. Keep your eye on campus for florals, camo and everything in between.

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  • Good Angles
    Sarah Badr, 20, Senior, Health Education and Criminal Justice
    “My personal style is kind of bipolar. I just look in my closet for something I haven’t worn before.”
  • Hang Loose
    Alex Helman, 20, Junior, Film and Business
    “I really just wore this shirt because it’s hot out. Oh, and I just got these shoes to match my pants.”
  • Flower Power
    Soraya Davallou, 21, Senior, Apparel Design and Merchandising
    “I plan on designing for the Fashion Network Association’s fall fashion show. I’m thinking about going with a tea garden design theme. I love patterns. I didn’t want to wear pants because it’s such a nice day.”
  • All Green Everything
    Sidney Moiwa, 23, Junior, Communications
    “I just like to throw everything together. I think this fall is a very printy season.”
  • Patchwork Print
    Ayoola Solarin, 20, Junior, English
    “I love London street style mixed with African influences. I’m looking forward to wearing my Chelsea boots for fall."
  • In the Mix
    Patricia Taylor-Perrayman, 22, Senior, Art Education
    “My style is a pajama-chic clown look. I like to find things nobody has ever seen before.“
  • Camo Cameo
    David Mwangi, 20, Sophomore, Industrial Design
    “I got these pants from TJ Max. I would have to say my style is inspired by Pharrell.”

 

Trending: SFSU Students Rock Their Denim

Whether it’s a tried-and-true jean jacket or a pant with a pop of color, denim is an all-around essential for trendy gators. Check out these fashionable students who do it right.

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  • Light Wash Dress
    Tamika Miller, 18, Freshman, Sociology
    "I just make my outfits up as I go. I like the style on campus because it’s not the same as anywhere else."
  • Burgundy Skinnies
    Spulu, 21, Sophomore, Ethnic Studies
    "This is the Bay Area, we have to layer up. I am inspired by a little bit of everything. I’m a shape shifter."
  • Denim and Dots
    Natalie Field , 20, Sophomore, Photojournalism
    “I am inspired by Zooey Deschanel and the 60s. What am I excited to wear this season? My roommate’s new clothes.”
  • Keeping it Casual
    Dennis Sherry, 20, Junior, Cinema
    “I don’t know what inspires me. This morning my pants were dirty so I wore these old ones instead.”
  • Worn and Torn Moto Jeans
    Char Mac, 29, Junior, Communications, and Dubie
    “I like worn jeans because they are edgy. I like to do my own thing. Today I added a country feel with these boots and a little hint of sexiness with my off the shoulder sweater. This season I am really excited to wear cashmere and over-sized sweaters.”
  • Back to Black
    Luis Lechuga, 21, Senior, Art History
    “I like everything tacky. I will incorporate one really tacky piece and tone down the rest of my outfit. My friend inspires my looks because she makes her outfits look so effortless.”
  • Think Big
    Lauren Storm-berg, 22, Senior, Art History
    “I like to shop in thrift stores. My favorite is Savers in San Jose. That’s where I got this huge denim jacket that I wear over everything.”
By Macy Williams and Melissa Landeros
Photos by Mike Hendrickson