Category Archives: The Stitch

University Design:School Pride and Fashion Collide

  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
  • Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __  cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12.  The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress
    Senior Apparel Design and Merchandising student __ cuts sews reuses SF State plastic street banners to construct universal unisex outfits in Burk Hall room 410, Wed. Mar. 12. The outfits will be showcased in a SF State fashion show in May. Photo by Tony Santos / Xpress

Written by Melissa Landeros
Photos by Tony Santos

Thick, coarse, dirty, unbearable to get around—SF State design students could not help but complain about having to work with such a difficult material for clothing. The royal purple and gold SF State banners that span all around campus were taken down from their poles and placed in the hands of the design students from the Apparel Design and Merchandising department (ADM). The students were given a task that would challenge their design skills. They were to create garments for Runway 2014: Provoke, an annual fashion show that the Fashion Network Association, a student-run organization, helps produce.

“We saw the material and were like what are we going to do with this,” says Soraya Davallou a design student. Aside from the material being an unknown fiber there were restrictions that accompanied the design process. The concept of “Universal Design” was set in place, meaning the construction of the garments needed to be unisex, and wearable for any shape or size.

The students’ work-space was comprised of long tables, sewing machines, and dress forms. The student designers scrambled to pin, sew, steam, and put together their purple and gold garments.

Nevertheless, the ADM students sought out this challenge in full force. Some manipulated the banners into becoming a softer material to work with by ironing it. Others dealt with broken sewing machine needles as well as edges that were rough and left unfinished.

“I really wanted the SF State logo to stand out in order to show school pride,” says Helen Nguyen. The designer and her partner did not like the restrictions of the designs but overcame them by adding adjustable straps to the garment in order to fit it in the one-size-fits-all spectrum.

While some students honed in on school pride, others focused on creating garments that would be considered unisex. Panphila Tan and her partner did just that by constructing a vest and a quilt that was adjustable with Velcro.

After struggling with such difficult material the design students executed seven garments that range from a modern kimono, a zoot suit and, a motorcycle inspired jacket and pant. From the workroom to the runway, the looks will be showcased at the San Francisco Design Center May 1st.

Design and Refine

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Written Melissa Landeros
Photos by John Ornelas

Bright lighting. Hues of earth tones. Pops of color. A mix of sleek jackets, tailored dresses, intricate outerwear, and fine accessories.  At five thousand square feet, the 440 Brannan studio and showroom is a combined workspace and shopping oasis comprising the ultimate wardrobe selection for all city slickers.

This thriving showroom, equipped with sewing machines, worktables, and a trendy atmosphere, lives up to their slogan of “wear something rare,” because that is exactly what it offers.

Garments are made directly in the showroom and once completed are put out on the floor for purchase. Clients can even stop in and see their

One of the designers working on her garment at the co-op, 440 Brannan Studio. Photo by John Ornelas / Xpress
One of the designers working on her garment at the co-op, 440 Brannan Studio. Photo by John Ornelas / Xpress

garment-to-be right on the cutting table during the creating process.  The showroom sets the stage for up-and-coming Bay Area designers to really show their gusto for fashion design.

Since 1996 owner Rodger Alan has kept 440 Brannan up and running.  His studio was not always a place where designers could produce their garments, but Alan says he “decided to share.”  He brought about the idea of allowing people to rent space and produce what they wanted.

Aside from Alan opening up his space to designers he also has opened it up to students. “You don’t just sweep up the floor when you work here, I actually teach you, and you learn shit,” Alan says. Many of the students working at the studio get hands on experience, and can create their own pieces as well.

Megan Jee, an SF State merchandising student, manages the studio and interns. She oversees the selection process of prospective designers and helps host the studios weekly fashion happy hour on Fridays from four forty to eight o’clock. Since not everyone is a designer and has the opportunity to create something, customers can go into the studio and browse the unique collections while sipping on free wine or beer. “What I really like about this studio is that you are free to create whatever you want,” Jee says.

Former SF State student Marco Ruiz is a current designer and says he really enjoys working at the studio, and appreciates the equipment Allan makes available. Ruiz also says that working at 440 Brannan has provided him with more experience and the opportunity to expand his brand in the future.

Alan says this is a place where, “you make things to sell.” His studio usually incorporates five to eight designers. However, there is a process individuals need to go through before they can rent a space.

One thing that Alan focuses on is whether or not prospective designers produce garments that will portray a similar street style that his studio embodies. The clean-cut urbanite that could take their looks from evening to night is the perfect candidate.  “Someone who makes wedding dresses would not work well in the studio,” Alan says.

Consistently featured menswear designers include Alan’s line Hieros, which is made of limited edition pieces and streetwise menswear. Alan’s esthetic is simple, he says, “If I want to make a cropped jacket, I make it.” Alan designs whatever he feels like creating, and he makes it in his size first. If one of his designs is in high demand he’ll make more.  If not, Alan keeps it for himself.

Women’s wear is also featured alongside the menswear designs.  Gordano is a modern unique clothing line created by Jill Giordano and Brian Scheyer that is inspired by architecture. Their designs include tops, dresses, and bottoms that can easily be converted from day to night.

Quality is important to Alan.  Thats what 440 Brannan is all about, a quality garment, made by quality designers in a space where maximum creativity is encouraged.

Halloween Costumes For a Broke College Student

Written by Macy Williams & Sarah Todd
Photos by John Ornelas

Had midterms last week? If so, we know for a fact that you haven’t even thought about a Halloween costume. The festivities are just a few days away, so we put together five budget-friendly costumes for fellow gators with a small amount of time and an even smaller amount of money.

  • Model: Celeste Feeling clever? Psychology majors will appreciate this costume. Throw on a silky slip and attach Freudian phrases to it. Look at you, getting all sassy and smart.
    Feeling clever? Psychology majors will appreciate this costume. Throw on a silky slip and attach Freudian phrases to it. Look at you, getting all sassy and smart.
  • Freudian Slip
    Model: Celeste
  • Everyone has an umbrella shoved in the back of their closet--it’s San Francisco, after all. Transform your old bumbershoot into everyone’s favorite sea creature with a little ribbon and a hot glue gun. Your friends will have no trouble finding you at the bar with this costume.
    Everyone has an umbrella shoved in the back of their closet--it’s San Francisco, after all. Transform your old bumbershoot into everyone’s favorite sea creature with a little ribbon and a hot glue gun. Your friends will have no trouble finding you at the bar with this costume.
  • jellyfish
    Model: Mike Hendrickson
  • Model: Sarah Got a sheet? Perfect, the classic sheet ghost costume is complete. But if you want to really turn heads this year, throw a bra on over that sheet and transform into a sexy sheet ghost. Laughs are guaranteed.
    Got a sheet? Perfect, the classic sheet ghost costume is complete. But if you want to really turn heads this year, throw a bra on over that sheet and transform into a sexy sheet ghost. Laughs are guaranteed.
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    Model: Sarah
  • Model: Sarah Todd The government shutdown has come and gone, but everyone is still talking about it. There’s nothing better than making fun of politics, so throw on some old pajama bottoms with a suit and tie and bam, you are a government official on holiday.
    The government shutdown has come and gone, but everyone is still talking about it. There’s nothing better than making fun of politics, so throw on some old pajama bottoms with a suit and tie and bam, you are a government official on holiday.
  • The Government Shutdown
    Model: Sarah Todd
  • Model: Virginia Tieman Remember those naked little troll dolls that sat and stared at you with beady little eyes? Let’s bring them to life! Use a nude colored tank top and glue a gem-like piece of paper to the  bellybutton area. Grab some spray hair dye and pull your hair into a point. Ladies will look adorable and guys will be downright creepy. It’s a win-win situation.
    Remember those naked little troll dolls that sat and stared at you with beady little eyes? Let’s bring them to life! Use a nude colored tank top and glue a gem-like piece of paper to the bellybutton area. Grab some spray hair dye and pull your hair into a point. Ladies will look adorable and guys will be downright creepy. It’s a win-win situation.
  • Troll Doll
    Model: Virginia Tieman

Embracing All Sizes

 

When someone hears the word “model” most people picture this 6 foot tall ,a size two women with lots of confidence and a sense of power to take command on a fashion runway. However, Morgan Weinert sees the word “model” in a different light.

SF State held its annual Body Positive Week and first ever “All-Bodies Fashion Show,” where it supports both the love for fashion and the different shapes and sizes people may have. For one whole week, students participated in different activities and workshops to help them love the most important person in their lives, themselves.

To kick off Body Positive Week, Weinert created an activity involving a chalk outline of ones body. Students were asked to point out one part of their body that they liked and say why. They also had to pick one part of their body that they did not like and turn it into a positive.

Weinert produced the fashion show because, “fashion is a great way for people to reclaim their body.” While it was San Francisco Fashion Week, it was also Body Positive Week in the Residential Life community.

Weinert believed that by having a fashion show open to all sizes in which students could model their own wardrobe it would lessen students negativity about their weight. During Body Positive Week one of Weinert’s goals was for students to understand that being healthy goes beyond nutrition and exercise. She, in addition, believes one’s sexuality, emotionally being, and stress levels are also things to take into consideration with one‘s wellbeing.

Weinert has been the Health and Wellness Coordinator for Residential Life for about 6 months now. Weinert is responsible for developing and implementing workshops, presentations, and activities that help reduce harm to oneself. Such activities include sexual wellness, sexual assault, exercise, and nutrition.

The following day students listened to Virgie Tovar, an activist and lecturer on fat discrimination and body image. Tovar’s lecture revolved around having better sex through body love. The third day marked National Women’s Health and Fitness Day, held at Malcolm X Plaza. Students were able to get information regarding sexual health, nutrition through games and brochures. The event also revolved around raising awareness about violence against women in order to prevent it.

The fashion show was the grand finale of Body Positive Week. Having declared the show open to all shapes and sizes it “gave people the opportunity to be fashionable in their own body,” Weinert says. SF State student Rajit Sandhu who modeled in the show says, “I was nervous to go out on the runway but I was still confidant and owned my body.”

The fashion show was said to feature San Francisco stylist Zuriel Bautista, who is inspired by the diversity of modern popular culture, but due to an unfortunate car accident he was not able to attend. Bautista’s aesthetic is influenced most by his grandfather’s wardrobe from the 1970’s and his utility workwear. This altered the timeliness of the fashion show and how many looks went down the runway. Nevertheless, the show went on, and hopefully the show will continue to be says Weinert.

At the same time, the show featured a handful of student fashionistas, it also featured lines from 31 Rax and Nooworks. 31 Rax is thrift store that offers hand-picked, vintage clothing for men and women. Owner Stephanie Madrinan who was present at the All Bodies Fashion Shows says, “the clothing found at 31 Rax is out of my own closet.” The models strutted down the runway in dresses, tribal print pieces, and all paired with unique jewelry. This vintage thrift store will soon be featured solely online and will also feature extended sizes.

Nooworks features numerous artists who create prints, which are then turned into garments such as dresses, shirts, and or leggings. Nooworks is also a participating store that currently carries plus sizes up to 18, but they plan on expanding their sizes to 4x. The clothing featured at the show was showcased by SF State students as well by Morgan Weinert who wore colorful, bold printed leggings.

While the fashion show was the grand final Weinert also encouraged students to attend the Folsom Street Fair that Sunday. Weinert says, “Folsom is a great way for those you are recently on their own to explore.” College is a great time to create who you want to be and everyone should take advantage of that says Weinert.

If there was only one important thing that Weinert wanted students to take away from all of Body Positive Week was that everyone should be excited to reclaim their body and that we are only given one body so appreciate it.

The SF State community took a stand in representing all types of individuals through the fashion show, opening the door for other student fashionistas thanks to Weinert. If that was not enough of a milestone for fashion, one may want to know that this year there was the first ever plus-sized line featured in New York Fashion Week by designer Eden Miller. Fashion is for everyone no matter what size you are.

Trending: SFSU Students Play with Pattern

By Macy Williams and Melissa Landeros
Photos by Mike Hendrickson

Print is never easy to pull off, but with a little swagger these students mix it up. Keep your eye on campus for florals, camo and everything in between.

  • Good Angles
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  • Good Angles
    Sarah Badr, 20, Senior, Health Education and Criminal Justice
    “My personal style is kind of bipolar. I just look in my closet for something I haven’t worn before.”
  • Hang Loose
    Alex Helman, 20, Junior, Film and Business
    “I really just wore this shirt because it’s hot out. Oh, and I just got these shoes to match my pants.”
  • Flower Power
    Soraya Davallou, 21, Senior, Apparel Design and Merchandising
    “I plan on designing for the Fashion Network Association’s fall fashion show. I’m thinking about going with a tea garden design theme. I love patterns. I didn’t want to wear pants because it’s such a nice day.”
  • All Green Everything
    Sidney Moiwa, 23, Junior, Communications
    “I just like to throw everything together. I think this fall is a very printy season.”
  • Patchwork Print
    Ayoola Solarin, 20, Junior, English
    “I love London street style mixed with African influences. I’m looking forward to wearing my Chelsea boots for fall."
  • In the Mix
    Patricia Taylor-Perrayman, 22, Senior, Art Education
    “My style is a pajama-chic clown look. I like to find things nobody has ever seen before.“
  • Camo Cameo
    David Mwangi, 20, Sophomore, Industrial Design
    “I got these pants from TJ Max. I would have to say my style is inspired by Pharrell.”

 

Trending: SFSU Students Rock Their Denim

Whether it’s a tried-and-true jean jacket or a pant with a pop of color, denim is an all-around essential for trendy gators. Check out these fashionable students who do it right.

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  • Light Wash Dress
    Tamika Miller, 18, Freshman, Sociology
    "I just make my outfits up as I go. I like the style on campus because it’s not the same as anywhere else."
  • Burgundy Skinnies
    Spulu, 21, Sophomore, Ethnic Studies
    "This is the Bay Area, we have to layer up. I am inspired by a little bit of everything. I’m a shape shifter."
  • Denim and Dots
    Natalie Field , 20, Sophomore, Photojournalism
    “I am inspired by Zooey Deschanel and the 60s. What am I excited to wear this season? My roommate’s new clothes.”
  • Keeping it Casual
    Dennis Sherry, 20, Junior, Cinema
    “I don’t know what inspires me. This morning my pants were dirty so I wore these old ones instead.”
  • Worn and Torn Moto Jeans
    Char Mac, 29, Junior, Communications, and Dubie
    “I like worn jeans because they are edgy. I like to do my own thing. Today I added a country feel with these boots and a little hint of sexiness with my off the shoulder sweater. This season I am really excited to wear cashmere and over-sized sweaters.”
  • Back to Black
    Luis Lechuga, 21, Senior, Art History
    “I like everything tacky. I will incorporate one really tacky piece and tone down the rest of my outfit. My friend inspires my looks because she makes her outfits look so effortless.”
  • Think Big
    Lauren Storm-berg, 22, Senior, Art History
    “I like to shop in thrift stores. My favorite is Savers in San Jose. That’s where I got this huge denim jacket that I wear over everything.”
By Macy Williams and Melissa Landeros
Photos by Mike Hendrickson