Life on Four Wheels

Lake Merced Boulevard is abuzz as cars, buses, and recreational vehicles rush by, honking and screeching. Down the side street of Winston Drive, there is a long line of vehicles parked inches from the passing traffic. One of them, a faded orange Bounder RV, stands tall enough that the blustery wind rattles tree branches against the roof. A sliver of sunlight streams behind the camper, the blue of Lake Merced peeking out just behind the rear corner. Continue reading Life on Four Wheels

The Unavoidable Commute

Story by Ingrid Mera and Antonio Dos Santos Lau. 

For many people, commuting in a train filled with characters such as those who wear crazy colored wigs and trash bags around their head, may not be out of the ordinary, and often times can be expected as the doors open before departing a station. But for riders on Bay Area Rapid Transit, the acceptance of everyone has created fear and betrayal within the system. Commuting, for many, is the only way of getting to work, school, and events. One’s commute may differ to someone else’s as the system has ridership from four a.m. to eleven p.m. at most stations. Continue reading The Unavoidable Commute

Bits & Bytes: The Cost of Free News

What’s the best way to make money? Give things away for free. This seemingly counterintuitive business model, utilized by tech giants such as Google and Facebook, is a more benign version of the old bait-and-switch. Free social interaction, instantaneous answers to the most burning questions, cat videos on command—all they ask for in return are bits and bytes of information. Why then, is information more costly to acquire than it is to give away? Continue reading Bits & Bytes: The Cost of Free News

Radical Education: Experimental Education at SFSU

“The very fact that you have chosen to teach your own class is political—it’s radical—and it’s an idea that can spread like wildfire,” Kathy Emery, 63, says to a room of some twenty students. The students are of all ages. They are listening attentively to Emery’s words, which seem to command the respect of a seasoned professor, but they are not here only as students. Continue reading Radical Education: Experimental Education at SFSU

Neon: Still Glowing

The nocturnal cityscape used to be dominated by glowing tubes of every shape and color. Neon lighting, exposed glass turned vibrant when the gas inside is bombarded with electrodes, was the main form of outdoor lighting in the country from the 1930s to the 70s. It has declined since then, replaced by cheaper and cleaner alternatives. Though, while neon may be a dying industry, it still has a passionate following. Continue reading Neon: Still Glowing

From Fauna to Flora

The work-space formally known as a garage, is a mix of motorcycles and flowers. One side of the dimly lit space is filled with tools and motorcycle parts while the other half has tables filled with freshly cut flowers. The two sides couldn’t be more different. They’re polar opposites.

Continue reading From Fauna to Flora

I Got the Post-Grad Blues

With graduation season looming around the corner, many that are graduating this May are eagerly anticipating the day. The day they walk that stage and can finally let out the sigh of relief and say they did it. Surely, this will be a very joyous and emotional time for the graduates, their friends, and family.

Everyone seems to talk about the lead up to graduation day and the happiness surrounding the occasion. But what happens when the long awaited day is over? What happens after that diploma is received? Continue reading I Got the Post-Grad Blues