Tag Archives: San Francisco Giants

Giants’ World Series Trophy Tour to Stop at SF State

The three SF Giants trophy will be at SF State. Photo from the Giants Twitter
The three SF Giants trophy will be at SF State. Photo from the Giants Twitter

The trophies commemorating the San Francisco Giants’ World Series victories in 2010, 2012, and 2014 will visit SF State on Wednesday as part of an ongoing tour.

The Giants spent more than fifty seasons without winning Major League Baseball’s top prize after moving to San Francisco from New York in 1958. They finally brought a championship to San Francisco by beating the Texas Rangers four games to one in 2010. The team followed this up with a four-game sweep of the Detroit Tigers two years later. Last year, the Giants won the World Series, this time in seven games over the Kansas City Royals. Between San Francisco and New York, the Giants have won eight titles.

The World Series trophy is the only piece of championship hardware in the four major American professional sports leagues not named for a specific individual. Its official name, The Commissioner’s Trophy, sets it apart from the National Hockey League’s Stanley Cup, the National Basketball Association’s Larry O’Brien Trophy, and the National Football League’s Vince Lombardi Trophy. Tiffany & Co. builds a new trophy for each year’s top baseball team.

The San Francisco Giants World Championship Trophy Tour began on January 7th and will run through Opening Day at AT&T Park on April 13th. Most of the tour takes place in California, extending as far south as San Luis Obispo, though it will also make stops in Nevada, Oregon, and even New York.

All three trophies will be at SF State on February Four from 9:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. in Jack Adams Hall. People will not be allowed to line up before 9:00 a.m. Each person may take one photo. Those in a group may either take separate pictures or one all together. A Giants representative may cut off the line early to ensure the trophies are able to leave on time and being in line during the scheduled time does not guarantee a chance to get a photo of them.

Quest for Three: Giants own Game 4

Fans pack AT&T Park in hopes that the Giants can pull off a win. Photo by Katie Lewellyn.
Fans pack AT&T Park in hopes that the Giants can pull off a win. Photo by Katie Lewellyn.

Game 4 of the World Series wholeheartedly belonged to the Giants. After a crazy first couple innings, the Giants surged forward and never looked back. The Giants beat the Royals 11-4 and tied the World Series 2-2.

Ryan Vogelsong had a solid first inning but quickly got himself into trouble in the third when Eric Hosmer started the Royals rally with a single. Vogelsong pitched 2.2 innings with seven hits, one ball, two strikeouts, and four earned runs.

The Giants started their rally early in the first when Hunter Pence hit into a fielder’s choice scoring Gregor Blanco. Things started to look bleak for the Giants though when Salvador Perez hit a single RBI extending the Royals’ lead 4-1.

In the third, Buster Posey hit an RBI single, scoring Duffy and shortening the Royals’ lead 4-2. During the fifth, Pence hit another RBI single, scoring Panik and inching the Giants closer to a tie. Pence was able to score after Juan Perez hit a sac fly, tying the game.

The rally really begun in the sixth when Pablo Sandoval hit a line drive single, scoring Posey and Blanco. Brandon Belt then singled on a ground ball, allowing both Pence and Sandoval to score. The Giants were in the lead 7-4.

Blanco continued the rally in the seventh after bunting, and Crawford was able to score on the bunt when Tim Collins overthrew the pitch. Joe Panik then doubled, scoring Morse and Blanco, extending the lead 10-4. Pence backed Panik up with another double and the score was 11-4.

The Giants came back from the dead and blew the Royals away in an amazing display of teamwork. They will play their last home game of the season tomorrow at AT&T Park with Madison Bumgarner on the mound.

Quest for Three: Giants drop the ball in Game 3

The Giants return home in hopes of getting the lead in the World Series. Photo by Katie Lewellyn.
The Giants return home in hopes of getting the lead in the World Series. Photo by Katie Lewellyn.

The Giants returned home to the Bay Area for Game 3 of the World Series, but after the Royals got an early jump, the Giants could not catch up. The Giants lost 3-2 and are now behind in the series 1-2.

Tim Hundson made his first ever World Series appearance but was quickly hurt by the Royals. In the first inning, Lorenzo Cain hit an RBI single off Hudson, giving the Royals an early 1-0 lead. Hudson pitched 5.2 innings with four hits, one ball, two strikeouts, and three earned runs.

In the sixth inning, the Royals extended their lead when Alex Gordob hit a line-drive double to center field. Eric Hosmer followed up by singling, giving the Royals a 3-0 lead.

The Giants did not give up hope though, and in the sixth, Michael Morse doubled on a ball to left field, scoring Brandon Crawford. With Morse on, Buster Posey hit into a ground out allowing Morse to score. The Giants were on the board 3-2.

The Giants could not make a comeback though, losing 3-2. The Giants will play again today at AT&T Park, hoping to turn this series around and get a win.

 

Moneyball

A menu displays the beer options of a vendor in the O.co Coliseum.
A menu displays the beer options of a vendor in the O.co Coliseum.

 

By Jessica Mendoza
Photos by Gabriella Gamboa

It’s a beautiful Wednesday morning. The skies are crystal clear. The sun rays shine over the empty Oakland Coliseum.

There are still a few hours until the first pitch and only a few cars in the parking lot. A large group of people dressed in green and yellow shirts with “Galleo” written on the back gather around a table, laughing and engaging in casual chit-chat. The table is set with salad, chips and other snacks. Coolers overflow with ice-cold beverages, under the table. The majority of them is wearing green and yellow shirts. The Galleo Winery is having a company party, getting pumped up for the big game.

Several feet away is a couple, Fred and Kristin, sitting in the back of a black pickup truck with their friend Melissa, eating street tacos and drinking beer from a small cooler. Another couple, Salvatore and Lindsay, sit on lawn chairs, waiting for hot dogs to finish cooking on a small, portable barbeque.

Tailgating is a common “pre-game” pass-time for sports fans all over the world who are eager to cheer on their favorite team and enjoy some good grub.

“Tailgating with a group of friends is best way to save money,” says Ritchie.

Bay Area sports teams have been getting more attention this year than ever before, with the Giants winning two World Series’ in the past three years. The A’s defeating a drought and winning last year’s AL West division title, and the 49ers stealing a spot in the Super Bowl. The Raider’s roster may be under construction still, but they even have die-hard fans who will always have their back.

As for basketball, the Golden Gate Warriors are leaving their mark on the NBA, with rising young players like Stephen Curry, and by making an appearance in the playoffs for the first time since 2007. In the hockey world, the Sharks still continue to fight for the Stanley Cup.

As the popularity of these teams continues to rise, so do ticket and food prices, and sporting fans end up spending more money at the game than they did on entrance into the stadium. The average price of a beer is $10, nachos are $8 and even a water bottle costs $5. Are you a diehard Bay Area sports fan who refuses to spend extra cash on snacks? Here are a few pre-gaming tips that are sure to help you save some money.

Tailgate with fellow fans
For those who don’t know who don’t know, a tailgate party is when a group of fans gather together behind a truck or SUV and enjoy potluck style food and drinks before the big game.

“You can tell your friends to buy foods,” says Ritchie as he describes about dividing the food and drinks at the tailgate parties. “You don’t have to worry about buying food for a group of 12 people or more. You can ask people to bring their own food or drinks.”

“Tailgating before Raider games, you can bring a twelve pack of beer for $12 bucks instead of buying a one beer in the stadium,” says Jamey, a regular the SF State Pub, referring to when it comes to attending Raider games.

Salvatore Rancadore (left) and girlfriend Lindsay Dworkin (right) enjoy beers and hot dogs before entering the O.co Coliseum for a game against Lose Angeles Angels.
Salvatore Rancadore (left) and girlfriend Lindsay Dworkin (right) enjoy beers and hot dogs before entering the O.co Coliseum for a game against Lose Angeles Angels.

Bring your own food!
Before you go to the game, stop by your local grocery store and buy your own snacks. This is one of the best ways to save money, but what happens if you go to sporting venue and they don’t allow outside food into the stadium? The best solution is grubbing before the game.

Celebrating before the game
A lot of fans meet up at local eateries around the stadium, before the game. It doesn’t matter if its fast food, a cafe, or a sit-down restaurant- the chances of it still being less expensive than buying food at the game are great.

“When I go to Warriors games, I’ll go eat somewhere before” says Bryn, SFSU student, “I usually go to In-N-Out by the stadium.”

What about the booze? Sports venues make a profit on alcohol. It’s how they make the money. But it’s too expensive. The key is simple purchase a case of beer and split among your friends before the game. A great way to save money instead of buying drinks in the stadium.

“I usually buy six packs before I go to the games,” says Jamey about drinking before going to Giants games.

If you still think you might spend more money than you think you want to at the game, the best advice I can give you is to bring a set amount of cash with you. Take $40 with you and leave your credit card behind, that way you can’t just keep spending.

Take the train
It’s no surprise that parking in San Francisco or any other Bay Area city is a bitch. In San Francisco, the streets in the city are small and narrow, and jam-packed with pedestrians and other drivers. Paying for parking is another whole pain in the you-know-what. Before the new season of the Giants, the meters have gone up to $7 per hour and the cut off period went from 6p.m. to 10p.m.

The solution to saving money is to take Bart or Muni. The price for a Muni pass will cost $2 for adults, and Bart varies depending on where you are going, but is rarely over $8.

“I live in the Sunset (district) and I hop on the N line”, say Vinnie, when he goes to the Giants games.

Oakland Athletics fans head toward the O.co Coliseum for a game against the Los Angeles Angels after exiting the BART station.
Oakland Athletics fans head toward the O.co Coliseum for a game against the Los Angeles Angels after exiting the BART station.

Some Giants fans like, Bryn, take the ferry to the Giants. The ferry boats stop in front of the port walk. Bryn prefer to use the ferry then drive to the city. If you do, however, need to drive to a game, make sure you bring a group of friends with you who can split the parking fee. Ritchie and his friends carpool to Raider’s games and say it is a lot cheaper to split the cost of a spot.

“Carpool and pitch in for parking,” says Ritchie, “it saves us money.”

Go for the Nosebleed Section
It’s always nice to get tickets with a great view, or to have the chance to sit closer to your favorite team when you want to get a closer look at the players, however, these tickets can be very pricey. Most of the good seats, like lower box seats, can cost $60 or more. If you’re just desperate to get to the game, but don’t have a lot of money, try out the nosebleed section! All of the seats are designed for the audience to be able to see the game. Just because you don’t have the “top” seat, doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy the action.