Indivisible SF: Liberty And Justice For All

A throng of protesters marched through downtown on route to Civic Center wearing lab coats, shouting support for science, and holding up clever signs with science puns and references taking a jab at President Trump. Coinciding with Earth Day, April 22’s March for Science brought protesters outside on a cloudy, but pleasant, day in San Francisco to display their support for all things . The protest highlighted the error in climate change naysayers, in Trump’s promise to deregulate the coal and oil industry, and in the proposed budget cuts to...

The Art Of “Chanoyu”: Bringing Japanese Tea Culture To Life

Walking into the tea room at the Nichi Bei Kai Cultural Center in Japantown brings back memories from the time I visited Japan last summer. The authentic tatami mat, doors made from white mulberry paper, and a sign written in Japanese above a vase with wild flowers, decorate the tea room. The coordinators, dressed in traditional kimonos, start  preparing the equipments for the tea ceremony. The first Saturday of the 50th Cherry Blossom Festival greets visitors with a sunny day, and its tea ceremony is one of the events that...

For Your Eyes Only: Realities Of Unwanted Photo Sharing

The flesh of my chest burned red as I desperately attempted to scrub off the greek letters drawn in black Sharpie. No amount of water and soap could be combined to remove the physical reminder of the photos I had drunkenly posed for. It wasn’t until months later that I would learn about the devastating way those images of me would be shared. According to a 2013 study done by cybercivilrights.org, 90 percent of non-consensual pornography victims are women. With the creation of the internet, and its ability to connect...

Perception: How Social Media Is Changing What It Means To Be An Immigrant

As I walked through Marco Forster Middle School’s courtyard, the murmurs between classmates began: “Are you cutting class or are you walking out?” Prior to the rise of social media, events spread through word of mouth between classmates and friends. A dash through the side of the main building, down the hill, and into my friend’s silver car was an easy way to avoid all on-duty campus monitors. After a smooth escape, everyone inside the car cheered as we went on our way to meet the other demonstrators. It was...

Race And Relationships

After thirty-three seasons of The Bachelor and its spinoff, The Bachelorette, dominating television sets with white leads and a poor attempt at diversity, the series has finally chosen a person of color to be its leading star. Rachel Lindsay, a thirty-one-year-old African-American attorney from Dallas, TX was announced as the new bachelorette in mid-February. Over the years, the hit reality show has gone through scrutiny for its lack of representation. All twelve bachelorettes have been white and in the twenty-one seasons of The Bachelor, there’s only been one lead who...

Out Of Options: International Students Fear Having To Find New Ways Of Making It In The Country

As I approach my last year in college, and time as a student (perhaps forever), I feel the atmosphere change and air getting thicker. Goosebumps travel along my arm as a reaction, not to a sudden change in temperature, but to the realization that hits me; this might be the end. The presidential election of 2016 didn’t just change the life of American citizens or permanent residents of this country, it affected people beyond U.S. borders. I used to have a solid plan. I would move to America for school...

Research And Activism At SFSU: Ideas Worth Standing Up For

Lindsay Faye sits in a big grey rocking chair, reading the Lorax to her two-and-a-half-year-old cousin Evelyn. As the last words of the poem approach, she chokes on tears. “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” For Faye, graduate marine science student, Scott Pruitt’s appointment as head of the Environmental Protection Agency brings overwhelming emotions. As a response to the poem and the news, she writes her own adaptation of the Lorax, but darker, more reflective of reality. In it,...

Art Meets Activism- A Look at Bay Area Artists Using Race, Power, and Politics to Send a Message

Without preparation I found myself in a dim room, encircled by lips mouthing disjointed words on the screens of smartphones. In the middle of the room, clear containers with flickering green neon lights inside them mesmerized me. The containers, it turns out, have a purpose. Within each of them are labels – words used to identify, divide, or stratify individuals. Although it was unclear at first, I began to notice the words being mouthed were also labels. Many of them carry negative connotations such as “disgusting,” “terrorist,” “deplorable,” and “nasty.”...

Differing Viewpoints- Student Republicans Face Criticism Inside and Outside the Classroom

Sweaty palms, an increased heart rate, and cold stares await Republican students who express their right to the First Amendment at San Francisco State University. Engineering student, and member of the Republican Student Union (RSU), Brian May, has realized his political views might not always be welcome at San Francisco State. But now more than ever, he and others are experiencing verbal and physical threats for being college students who voted for President Donald Trump. Brian has ‘come out’ to most of his close friends about being a conservative, even...

Questions Flaming- Student Housing Conditions Spark Safety Concerns

  A move-in frenzy took over Buckingham Way near San Francisco State University in August last year as University Park North (UPN) student housing opened up. After her gratifying freshmen experience living in the Towers of Centennial Hall last, 21-year-old sophomore, Joanna Sanchez was excited to see her new residence. Upon arrival though, she stood aghast at the site of her new home — a building encrusted with colonies of mold,  windows puzzled together with plywood, and an array of litter along the unkempt lawn that lent the building an...

Out Of Luck- International Students Threatened by Trump’s Administration

“I think having an OPT and H-1B visa is what makes America great,” says a dark-haired man wearing black, rectangular-shaped glasses. “You can attract power and intellectual minds from all over the world to work in the U.S., to help gain better innovations and get better ideas of what’s happening in the global sense.”             Twenty-two-year-old Ka Wing Tsang, also known as Louis, is one of the many international students at San Francisco State University planning to apply for an Optional Practical Training (OPT), an off-campus work authorization for students with...

Stay California

The dystopian scenario everyone loves to fantasize about is here. Factions have been formed, the union has divided, and the protagonist of the situation might actually be the villain. California might not be far into the storyline yet, but a group focused on separating the Golden State from the United States, is pushing it along. The ballot measure campaign committee, Yes California, has one goal: to give Californians the opportunity to vote themselves out of the Union, and into its own independent nation. Historically, this hasn’t really worked out, but...